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Contents

  1. 59 Automorphism Groups of Special Ag Groups
  2. 59.1 AutGroupSagGroup
  3. Iconic Jewelry: Cartier's Panther | Jewels du Jour | Bling | Jewelry, Cartier panther, Cat jewelry
  4. 1836 Likes :

I have a simple pie chart, that animates on load out of the box from chart. Any pointers out there; the chart. I have discovered ways to execute jQuery with breakpoints as you can see in the commented code below, but the actual animation within just ignores and fires at every scroll adjustment. Also here is main external chart. PI; this. Color this. BomberMan 2 2 gold badges 10 10 silver badges 31 31 bronze badges. Captain Ron Captain Ron 4, 17 17 gold badges 58 58 silver badges bronze badges. If anyone is interested -- I achieved my goal with this plugin.

Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook. Sign up using Email and Password. The load-indicating device is slipped over the threaded end of the bolt so that it is disposed against the bearing surface. A nut is then threaded onto the bolt, and tightened down so that it comes into contact with the load indicating device. After the nut comes into contact with the load-indicating device, torque is continuously applied to the nut until, hopefully, a designed-for failure of the load-indicating device occurs.

Applying torque to the nut causes it to compress the load-indicating device between itself and the bearing surface. This creates an equal but opposite tension force between the bolt and the structural member anchoring it, testing that connection. The load indicating device is designed to fail under a selected compressive force. Generally, the load-indicating device is selected to fail before the other members, but at a point where a meaningful load has been applied that tests the strength of the bolt and the strength of the connection between the bolt and the structural member.

Failure of the load-indicating device is indicated in a variety of fashions, and many devices are designed to fail once at a given load, but then be able to perform well beyond that load for the life-time of the connection. These particular devices are designed to be left in place after the connection has been tested. Other devices are used to measure whether a selected load on the bolt exceeds a given value. Simple mechanical devices include washers having raised protuberances which are compressed back into the body of the washer under a given load.

Other such members have a weakened intermediary portion between two main portions, the intermediary portion failing and allowing the two main portions to then bear on each other without similar failure at well beyond the first load. Other devices use washers that are broken between cooperating dies and punches. Other devices bend intermediate washer rather than break them. Some such devices are even designed to provide an indication when the selected load is removed from the load indicating device.

The device of the present invention differs from the devices of the prior art of which the inventor is aware by providing a tamper resistant method of proving that a bolt has been tested at a given load, without having to maintain the load on the bolt. In its most basic form, the present invention is a device for indicating whether a predetermined compressive load has been applied to the device.

The device is formed to receive an anchor member upon which a tensioning force is to be applied in conjunction with loading the device. The device can be used on a variety of anchor members embedded in cementitious members. Cementitious members can be concrete block, brick, masonry, rock, and concrete to name a few examples.

59 Automorphism Groups of Special Ag Groups

Commonly used anchor members include: threaded members all-thread rod, carriage bolts, bolts of various shapes and other types of mechanical anchors. The anchor member can be embedded directly in the cementitious member, or it can be received by a blind opening and bonded to the cementitious member by means of an adhesive.

The adhesive could include a cementitious grout, epoxy, an acrylic adhesive, a polyester, vinyl ester or some other types of bonding agent The device can also be used on anchor members welded or bonded to a steel plate. The device itself has an upper press that has an aperture formed to receive the anchor member and also has means for manipulating a washer. The device also has a lower die with an aperture formed to receive the anchor member.

59.1 AutGroupSagGroup

The lower die is formed so as to be able to work in conjunction with the upper press when the upper press and lower die are aligned and moved towards each other. The lower die also has means for manipulating the washer. The means for manipulating the washer are also formed to cooperate with the means for manipulating the washer on the upper press. The device also has a washer that lies between the upper press and the lower die.

The washer is formed so that when the washer is acted upon by the means for manipulating the washer of the upper press and the lower die it will indicate visually whether a selected compression load has been applied to the washer. The washer member can also have one or more inner portions that are formed so that when the washer is acted upon by the means for manipulating the washer, one or more inner portions can extend inwardly toward the anchor member and can be pressed into said anchor member.

The present invention also pertains to a method of applying a tension load to an anchor member held in a cementitious member. First, a lower die is slipped over the anchor member so that the lower die rests on the cementitious member. A bearing plate could also be put over the anchor member first, and the lower die could rest on it. A washer can already be inserted into the lower die and slipped over the anchor member with it, or it can be slipped over the anchor member separately.

A upper press is then slipped onto the anchor member and over the washer member and lower die. Sometimes the upper press can be formed with an alignment member, or it can have an alignment member attached to it, or a separate alignment member can be slipped around the upper press and the lower die after they have been inserted over the anchor member. Then a nut is tightened onto the anchor member until the washer member is deformed in a manner such that it provides a visual indication that a given load has been applied to the washer and the washer has been pressed into the anchor member.

The nut can then be removed, removing the compressive force from the upper press, the washer and the lower die, however, the washer remains locked onto the anchor member. It is an object of the present invention to provide a simple, inexpensive means for testing whether an anchored bolt can resist a given tension load. This object is accomplished in part by providing a load-indicating device in which a relatively inexpensive, disposable member is broken or deformed at a predetermined load by a cooperating die and press.

When the washer is broken at a predetermined load, it is done so by a breaking action which is at least in part shearing. This object is further accomplished by making the die and press as relatively small and light-weight members that can be manually set-up and operated by a single user with readily available hand-tools. It is another object of the present invention to provide a load indicating device that provides clear evidence that the bolt has been tested.

The disposable washer is designed to adopt an easily recognized final shape when a given load has been applied. The final shape of the washer can be either a product of breaking the washer or a combination of the breaking and deforming the washer. This object is also accomplished in part by the use of a disposable washer which is deformed when a selected load is applied.

This object is further accomplished by the design which allows the press to be removed from the bolt so that the broken washer can be easily viewed. It is a further object to provide a load-indicating device that readily indicates to the operator applying the load to the device that a selected load has been achieved. In the embodiments that work with a shearing action, this is accomplished by having the cooperating die and press break the washer in a manner such that there is significantly less resistance to the compressive force generated by the operator after the washer has been sheared by a given load.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide tamper resistant evidence that the bolt has been tested. This is accomplished by deforming the disposable washer during and after the testing operation such that it can be locked onto the threads and between the bolt and either the lower die or upper press. The objects of providing a simple and inexpensive testing device are further accomplished in the preferred embodiment by forming the press and die so that the press can be reused.

The die can also be reused, however, it has been found that is preferable to make the die disposable as well. In the preferred embodiment, the die is made of comparatively soft material with respect to the press. This achieves two objects. First, since it is soft, if for some reason the cooperating press and die are misaligned or the washer prematurely fails and damage to the device is sustained, the damage is more likely to be borne by the die. Thus the press is preserved, extending its life. Second, it is less expensive to form the lower die of a relatively soft material, and as indicated below, in the preferred embodiment, to provide evidence that a bolt has been tested it is necessary to leave the lower die and the broken washer on the bolt until it has been examined.

Also, as a matter of convenience for the user, it is desirable to sell the disposable washer pre-loaded into the lower die. The present invention is shown being used with a bearing plate and a nut and washer that are used for generating the compression for on the direct tension indicator. The direct tension indicator is shown in cross-section along with the cementitious member and the adhesive agent bonding the anchor member to the cementitious member. A bearing plate is also shown, along with a nut and a washer that overlies the upper press.

The upper press along with an attached anchor sleeve are shown being inserted over the anchor member. A nut and corresponding washer are shown being threaded onto the anchor member. The bearing plate has been removed. The lower die is shown with a scalloped portion that accommodates an adhesive agent such as epoxy that is shown projecting above the cementitious member. The preferred embodiment is shown just before the compressive force is applied to it. The preferred embodiment is shown after a compressive force has been applied to it that is sufficient to shear the washer and drive the inwardly projecting portions onto the threads of the anchor member.

Pieces of the outer portion of the disposable washer have been broken off and are shown lying along side the lower die for clarity. These pieces would be normally found in the upper recess after the upper press had been removed. The disposable washer member has also been broken into four pieces that remain locked between the anchor member and the lower die. The lower die, disposable washer, and upper press along with an attached anchor sleeve are shown inserted over the anchor member.

A nut and corresponding washer are shown threaded onto the anchor member and ready to compress the direct tension indicator. The direct tension indicator is shown resting on a bearing plate that in turn rests on a mudsill. However, it shows a modified, u-shaped bearing plate that bears upon the cementitious member. Also the anchor member is only partially threaded with the inwardly projecting portions of the disposable washer member set to be pressed into the non-threaded portion of the anchor member.

A bearing plate is also shown. In this embodiment the alignment member is formed as part of the upper press. The direct tension indicator is shown in cross-section. The direct tension indicator is shown inserted onto an anchor member welded to a steel plate. The lower die, disposable washer, and upper press along with an attached anchor sleeve are shown being inserted over the anchor member.

A nut and washer are also shown for compressing the direct tension indicator between the steel plate and itself. The direct tension indicator is shown inserted onto an anchor member embedded in a concrete foundation. A nut and washer are also shown for compressing the direct tension indicator between the concrete foundation and itself. The direct tension indicator is shown in cross-section, along with the cementitious member. The lower die, disposable washer, and upper press are shown being inserted onto an anchor member A nut and washer are also shown being inserted onto the anchor member.

This particular embodiment is shown with an alignment sleeve. As shown in FIGS. Each of the die 2, press 3 and washer 4 are formed with apertures 5, 6 and 7 for fitting over an anchor member 8. The die 2 and press 3 operate on the washer 4 as load is applied to them. The lower die 2 bears upon an unyielding bearing surface 9, and the upper press 3 is pushed towards the die 2 by a nut 10 threaded onto the anchor member 8. The washer 4 breaks or deforms when the compression load between the press 3 and die 2 is greater than or equal to a predetermined value.

The upper press 3 and lower die 2 are formed with means for manipulating a washer 4 which cooperatively act upon the disposable washer 4. See FIG. The lower die 2 is formed so as to be able to work in conjunction with the upper press 3, when the upper press 3 and lower die 2 are aligned and moved towards each other. The disposable washer 4 is formed so that when the washer 4 is acted upon by the means for manipulating the washer 4 of the upper press 3 and the lower die 2 it will indicate visually whether a selected compression load has been applied to the washer 4.

The washer 4 also has one or more inner portions that are formed so that when the washer 4 is acted upon by the means for manipulating the washer 4, these inner portions can extend inwardly toward the anchor member 8 and can be pressed into the anchor member 8. In the preferred form, the upper press 3 and lower die 2 have shearing formations 11 and 12 that contact the washer 4 to cooperatively break the washer 4 when the predetermined load is reached. In the preferred form, these shearing formations 11 and 12 make up part of the means for manipulating the washer 4.

The washer 4 is broken by an action between the formations 11 and 12 that is shearing for the most part. Preferably, the shearing formations 11 and 12 comprise a pair of annular cutting surfaces, one on the press 3 and one on the die 2 that nest one-within-the other.

The shearing formations 11 and 12 are movable towards each other, cutting the washer 4 as they come together. Preferably, the formations 11 and 12 are cylindrical and extend parallel to the direction of relative movement of the die 2 and press 3. After the cutting of the washer 4, the broken washer 4 is retained in the lower die 2.

See FIGS. Removal of the upper press 3 reveals the broken washer 4 showing that the bolt 8 has been tested to a selected predetermined load. Preferably, an alignment member 14 is used to position the die 2 and press 3 such that their annular cutting surfaces 12 and 11 are in proper alignment. Preferably, the alignment member 14 takes the form of a hollow cylindrical sleeve. Preferably, the alignment sleeve 14 fits around both the upper press 3 and the lower die 2. The lower die 2 is closely received by the alignment sleeve Preferably, the alignment sleeve 14 is strong enough to help resist any outward deflection of the lower die 2 caused by the compressive pressure on it from the upper press 3.

The alignment sleeve 14 could also be used to align the breakable, deformable washer 4, however, in the preferred embodiment the washer 4 is received by the lower die 2 and held in place by an upper recess 15 designed specifically for holding the washer 4 in the correct position. Preferably, the alignment sleeve 14 is a piece separate from either the die 2 or the press 3 and it receives both.

Forming the alignment sleeve 14 as a separate member can provide another indication to the operator that the device 1 has been used in the correct manner. The alignment sleeve 14 is designed so that it can rest on the bearing surface 9: its lower surface 16 being flush with the lower surface 17 of the lower die 2.

The alignment sleeve 14 is also designed to have a selected height that will place its upper surface 18 flush with or above the upper surface 19 of the upper press 3 when the load-indicating device 1 has been pressed down onto the lower die 2 as far as it will go with a particular washer 4 disposed between the upper press 3 and a lower die 2.

Thus, when the operator observes that the upper surface 19 of the upper press 3 is flush with or below the upper surface 18 of the alignment sleeve 14, and a washer 4 of a selected thickness is used, the operator will know to stop turning the nut 10 onto the bolt 8. The alignment sleeve 14 can also be made integral with either the lower die 2 or the upper press 3.

The alignment sleeve 14 is preferably formed with an annular peripheral inset 20 at its lower end. This allows levers to be hooked under the sleeve 14, to aid in the removal of the upper press 3 and alignment sleeve The alignment sleeve 14 is also preferably formed with an annular notch 22 on its inner surface This notch 22 receives part of a positioning ring 23 that is also preferably received in an annular notch 24 in the outer surface 25 of the upper press 3. The ring 23 is preferably made from spring steel and prevents the alignment sleeve 14 from sliding completely off the upper press 3.

The annular notch 22 in the alignment sleeve 14 is preferably just large enough to receive the ring 23, while the annular notch 24 in the upper press 3 is preferably wide enough for the ring 23 to slide up and down on the upper press 3 within the notch 24, allowing the alignment sleeve 14 to slide up and down on the upper press 3. The presence of the ring 23 prevents either of the parts from being lost when not in use. In the preferred embodiment, because it is desirable to provide tamper resistant evidence that the anchor member 8 has been tested, the deformable washer 4 and the upper press 3 and lower die 2 are formed so that after the washer 4 has been broken by the shearing action of the upper press 3 and lower die 2, portions of the washer 4 can be locked between the anchor member 8 and the annular shearing formation 12 of the lower die 2 by bearing surfaces 26 and 27 in the upper press 3 and lower die 2.

In the preferred embodiment these bearing surfaces 26 and 27 lie inwardly of the shearing formations 11 and In the preferred form, the breakable, deformable washer 4 is formed with an outer periphery 28 that closely corresponds in dimension and shape to the upper recess 15 in the lower die 2 for holding the washer 4. The washer 4 is also formed with an central aperture 7 that allows the washer 4 to be slipped over the bolt 8. The washer 4 extends inward from the outer periphery In the present invention, the term inward is used to describe areas that lie closer to the anchor member 8 than other areas lying along a ray passing through the long axis 29 of the anchor member 8 and lying perpendicular to the long axis 29 of the anchor member 8.

In the preferred embodiment, at some portions along its generally ring-like shape, the washer 4 is only wide enough to present a member appropriate for being sheared by the formations 11 and 12 on the upper press 3 and lower die 2. In the preferred embodiment, this is considered the outer portion At other portions along its periphery it extends inwardly and substantially close to the outer surface 30 of the bolt 8, helping to create the ability to achieve a close fit between the outer surface 30 of the bolt 8 and the shearing formation 12 of the lower die 2 after the washer 4 has been sheared.

In other embodiments the division between the outer portion 13 of the washer 4 and the inwardly projecting portion 31 or portions is not so easily defined.

Iconic Jewelry: Cartier's Panther | Jewels du Jour | Bling | Jewelry, Cartier panther, Cat jewelry

For example, the washer 4 shown in FIG. In effect it has only one inwardly projecting portion 31, as opposed to distinct tabs 31 extending from the outer portion 13 of the washer 4 as shown, for example, in FIG. If the washer 4 is to be bent or sheared, the outer portion 13 of the washer 4 is where this action takes place. In the preferred embodiment the inwardly projecting portions 31 are formed as a plurality of distinct tabs These tabs 31 extend inwardly from the outer portion 13 toward the anchor member 8. The projecting portions 31 also extend at an angle less than ninety degrees to the long axis 29 of the anchor member 8 for a portion of their length.

These inwardly and angularly extending projecting portions 31 are formed to be pressed into the anchor member 8 by the cooperating bearing surfaces 26 and 27 of the upper press 3 and the lower die 2. In the preferred embodiment, in order to improve the ability of the washer 4 to lock itself between the bolt 8 and the shearing formation 12 or surface of the lower die 2, the inwardly projecting portions 31 of the washer 4 are bent at angle less than 90 degrees to the long axis 29 of the anchor member 8.

Because the inwardly projecting portions 31 start at the outer periphery 28 of the washer 4 which lies outwardly from the shearing surfaces 12 and 11 of the lower die 2 and the upper press 3, and then extend almost to the outer surface 30 of the bolt 8, the bend in the inwardly projecting portions creates a tab 31 or member that is longer than the distance between the shearing formation 12 of the lower die 2 and the outer surface 30 of the anchor member 8 as measured normal to the long axis 29 of the anchor member 8.

This too helps to lock the inwardly projecting portions 31 of the washer 4 in place. In the preferred embodiment, the downwardly and inwardly projecting portions 31 of the disposable washer 4 work in combination with bearing surfaces 26 and 27 on the upper press 3 and lower die 2 to lock the projecting portions 31 into place after the washer 4 has been sheared. These bearing surfaces 26 and 27 lie inwardly from the shearing surfaces 11 and 12, parallel to each other and lie generally normal to the long axis 29 of the bolt 8.

After the operator tightens the nut 10 against the upper press 3 onto the bolt 8 sufficiently to shear the washer 4 he will feel the resistance to his turning of the nut 10 drop appreciably. If he then continues to tighten the nut 10 on the bolt 8, he will move the bearing surface 26 on the upper press 3 closer to the bearing surface 27 of the lower die 2.

He will continue the pushing of the inwardly projecting portions 31 downward into the main recess 32 of the lower die 2 where more of each of the inwardly projecting portions 31 will encounter the lower bearing surface As the upper press 3 continues to bear down upon the inwardly projecting portions 31, they will be diverted by the lower die bearing surface 27 first towards the threads 33 of the bolt 8, and then as they are resisted by the threads 33 of the bolt 8 towards the shearing formation 12 of the lower die 2.

If the operator continues turning the nut 10 until the upper press bearing surface 26 and lower die bearing surface 27 are as close as they can be, the inwardly projecting portions 31 will be driven up against the shearing surface 12 of the lower die 2 and into the outer surface 30 of the anchor member 8, locking the inwardly projecting portions 31 in place. Preferably, the anchor member 8 is threaded where the inwardly projecting portions 31 grab the bolt 8, and so the inwardly projection portions 31 are driven between the threads Thus, the inwardly projecting portions 31 are jammed between the shearing surface 12 of the lower die 2 and the outer surface 30 of the anchor member or bolt 8.

The inner edges 34 of the inwardly projecting portions 31 bear against the outer surface 30 of the anchor member 8 and the new outer portion of the washer 4 bears against the shearing formation 12 of the lower die 2. The inwardly projecting portions 31 are preferably formed with long notches 35, extending inwardly from the outer periphery 28 of the washer 4.

These notches 35 weaken the inwardly projecting portions 31, which allows the inwardly projecting portions 31 to be deformed and driven into the threads 33 of the bolt 8 more easily. Instead of notches 35, slots or openings 36 can be formed in the inwardly projecting portions 31 to weaken them. In the preferred form, notches 37 are formed to one side of each of the inwardly projecting portions 31, extending outwardly from the inner periphery 38 of the washer 4.

Specifically the notch 37 is formed between an inwardly projecting portion or tab 31 and one of the adjacent portions of the washer 4, where the washer 4 is only wide enough to be adequately sheared. These notches 37 extend far enough toward the outer periphery 28 of the washer 4, such that they reach to where the shearing surfaces 11 and 12 will break the washer 4 or the shear line By removing the portions of the washer 4 to the outside of the shear line 39, the connection between adjacent parts of the washer 4 to either side of the notch 37 is lost.

The portions of the washer 4 inward of the shear line 39 will be separated from each other after the washer 4 is broken. This, too, helps weaken the washer's resistance to being deformed and pressed into locking engagement with the threads 33 of the bolt 8 and the lower die's shearing surface or formation While the preferred form is made with four inwardly projecting portions 31 and four corresponding inward notches 37, the number of notches 37 could be manipulated to increase or decrease the washer's resistance to being bent onto the anchor member 8.

If only one notch 37 was made in the washer 4, the washer 4 would retain its characteristic ring shape even after it was broken. In the preferred form the notches 37 for breaking the ring structure of the washer 4 to the inward side of the shear line 39 are disposed next to each inwardly projecting portion or tab 31, but this need not be the case. Preferably the inwardly projecting portions 31 are formed to extend down to the lower die bearing surface 27 prior to being deformed.

Preferably, the inwardly projecting portions 31 make contact with the lower bearing surface 27 before they end close to the outer surface 30 of the anchor member 8, this allows bends to be formed in the inwardly projecting portions 31 to create end flanges 40 in the inwardly projecting portions The end flanges 40 run along the lower die bearing surface 27 and extend towards the bolt 8. The end flanges 40 help direct the inwardly projecting portions 31 to extend towards the bolt 8 at first when the shearing and deformation of the washer 4 begins.

The end flanges 40 are formed with an inner edge This inner edge 34 is preferably shaped to fit closely with the arced outer surface 30 of the anchor member 8. Preferably, the inwardly projecting portions 31 of the washer 4 of the preferred embodiment taper as they extend towards the anchor member 8.

Preferably, the inwardly projecting portions 31 of the washer 4 are driven into the threads 33 of the anchor member 8, but they need not be. As it is desirable to make and use a limited number of press 3 and die 2 sets to accommodate a variety of conditions, differing load values for shearing the washer 4 are achieving by varying the shape and thickness of the washer 4. By forming openings 41 in the washer 4 where the shearing formations 11 and 12 on the press 3 and die 2 will shear or bend the washer 4, the resistance of the washer 4 to being sheared or bent is reduced.

Furthermore, by increasing the thickness of the washer 4, the resistance to being sheared or bent increases. Thus, one press 3 and die 2 set can be used with a variety of washers 4 to test anchor members 8 at a variety of loads. While it is true that by varying the shape and thickness of the washer a single press 3 and die 2 set can be used to test a bolt 8 at a variety of different loads, however, it is more common that the need to test at different loads is necessitated by changes in the diameter of the bolts 8 being used.

Generally, different sized bolts 8 are designed for different loads and thus need to be tested at different loads. Since the inwardly projecting portions 31 of the washer 4 need to extend close to the outer surface 30 of the anchor member, preferably to get very accurate predetermined loads, each different anchor member diameter requires its own washer, or washers if it is to be tested at different loads.

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Deformation of the inwardly projecting portions 31 can take place before the washer 4 is completely sheared. When this occurs, the spacing of the inwardly projecting portions 31 from the outer surface 30 of the bolt 8 can be important in ensuring that the shearing force is achieved at a particular load. If the inwardly projecting portions 31 are formed too close to the anchor member 8, they will start to press on the anchor member 8 too soon, creating additional resistance to the downward movement of the upper press 3.

On the other hand, if the inwardly extending projections 31 are formed too far away from the outer surface 30 of the bolt 8 they cannot properly lock with the bolt or anchor member 8. Furthermore, because it is necessary for the bearing surfaces 26 and 27 of the upper press 3 and the lower die 2 to direct the inwardly projecting portions 31 to lock onto the threads 33 they too must extend close to the outer surface 30 of the bolt 8. Thus each different bolt diameter should also require its own upper press 3 and lower die 2 to predictably get load values within a very specific range.

Since, in the preferred form, the lower die 2 is disposable like the washer 4 and the disposable washer 4 comes inset in the lower die 2, it is a simple matter to make different sized dies 2 for each size bolt 8. However, since it is intended that the upper press 3 be reused in the preferred form, the upper press 3 is designed to be used with a variety of bolt diameters.

This is accomplished by using the upper press 3 in combination with a sizing sleeve The upper press 3 is formed with an internal bore 6 having a shoulder 43 that receives a variety of sizing sleeves 42 each with a similar external diameter and a similar external shoulder 44 that fits into the bore 6 and shoulder 43 of the upper press 3.

The sizing sleeves 42 differ from each other in terms of their internal apertures Each has an internal aperture 45 designed to closely receive a particular anchor member 8 of a given diameter. Each sizing sleeve 42, when fitted into the upper press 3 has an upper surface 46 that lies flush with the upper surface 19 of the upper press 3 and a lower bearing surface 47 that lies flush with the bearing surface 26 of the upper press 3.

The lower bearing surface 47 of the sleeve 42 in combination with the bearing surface 26 of the upper press 3 creates an upper press bearing surface 26 that extends from the shearing surface 11 of the upper press 3 to close to the outer surface 30 of the particular bolt 8 received.

An upper washer 48 that overlays either portions or all of both the upper surface 46 of the sizing sleeve 42 and the upper surface 19 of the upper press 3 can be used to move the sizing sleeve 42 and upper press 3 down in unison, although such is not necessary. Since it is expected that the load-indicating device 1 of the present invention will commonly be used to test anchor bolts 8 secured to a concrete member 49 by means of epoxy 50, it is desirable to form the lower die 2 with an outer diameter sufficient to extend beyond the largest opening commonly used to receive an anchor bolt 8 that is to be secured by epoxy 50 and tested with a load-indicating device 1.

Further, as shown in FIG. Generally, the operator will chip away any excess epoxy 50 that spills out onto the upper bearing surface 9 of the concrete or cementitious member 49, however, some epoxy 50 residue is generally left on the bolt 8 above the bearing surface 9 of the concrete member The inventive method of testing a bolt 8 embedded in a cementitious member 49, according to the preferred embodiment, is practiced in the following manner. A bolt or anchor member 8 attached to a cementitious member 49 is selected to be tested.

If for some reason a bearing plate 52 is needed to distribute the load that will be applied to the cementitious member 49 or some other member resting on the cementitious member 49, such as a mudsill 53, near or around the bolt 8, a bearing plate 52 can be slipped over the bolt 8. The bearing plate 52 should be designed with an internal aperture or notch 54 for receiving the bolt 8 that is wider than the anchor member 8 but narrower than the lower die 2. The aperture or notch 54 in the bearing plate 52 should be wide enough to accommodate the normal amount of epoxy 50 that may adhere to the threads 33 of the bolt 8 above the surface of the epoxy 50 and the concrete Next the lower die 2 and disposable washer 4 are slipped over the bolt 8, preferably as a unit.

Next the sleeve 42 suitable for the particular anchor bolt 8 to be tested is fitted in the upper press 3, and the upper press 3 is sipped over the bolt 8, preferably with the alignment sleeve The lower die 2 is received in the alignment sleeve 14, aligning the shearing formations 11 and 12 in the upper press 3 and lower die 2. At this point, the alignment sleeve 14 should rest on the bearing surface 9 and its upper surface 18 should be below the upper surface 19 of the upper press 3.

A washer 4 is slipped over the bolt 8 so that it rests on the upper press 3 and the sizing sleeve A nut 10 is then threaded onto the bolt 8, and tightened down so that it comes into contact with upper washer 48 on the load indicating device 1. Torque is continuously applied to the nut 10 until the disposable washer 4 is sheared.


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This is designed to occur at a predetermined compressive force on the washer 4. The shearing of the washer 4 signifies that the washer 4 has been subjected to a selected compressive force, but more importantly it signifies that the bolt 8 has been subjected to a tension force of equal magnitude. After the operator shears the washer 4, he should notice that the resistance to tightening the nut 10 decreases dramatically.

If he then keeps tightening the nut 10 onto the bolt 8 until significant resistance is encountered the inwardly projecting portions 31 of the washer 4 will be locked in between the threads 33 of the bolt 8 and the shearing surface 12 of the lower die 2, creating a tamper resistant indicator that the bolt 8 has been subjected to a selected tension load. With selected disposable washers 4 the operator will also know that he has tightened the nut 10 as far down as necessary when the upper surface 19 of the upper press 3, aligns with the upper surface 18 of the alignment sleeve 14 or lies below it.

The operator then backs off the nut 10, removes the upper washer 48 and the upper press 3, revealing the broken washer 4 with its inwardly projecting portions 31 locked into the main recess 32 of the lower die 2. As long as the lower die 2 remains undisturbed the inwardly projecting portions 31 will remain locked in place. An inspector can then come and examine the washer 4 and lower die 2.

If the inwardly projecting portions 31 are locked between the threads 33 and the shearing surface 12 of the lower die 2, he will know that the bolt 8 has been tested. The inspector can confirm this by lightly trying to twist the lower die 2.